Book Review: They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera

They Both Die at the End by Adam Silvera | rainerlife.com

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They Both Die at the End
by Adam Silvera

Synopsis: Two teens receive phone calls shortly after midnight informing them they will die that day. Both teens find themselves alone on their final day and use an app to find a last day friend. They’ve got one day to live life to the fullest.

I liked the idea of the book. A phone call telling you that today is your last day. That’s intriguing. And kind of creepy. So, the Death-Cast part of the story was interesting and I wanted to know more. Unfortunately, there was no more to that story, so that was disappointing.

For me, this book did not have a great flow to it. I enjoyed the story being told from both teen’s viewpoints, plus occasional chapters from others in the book. However, it felt a little disjointed and I didn’t really care about the characters, which is sad, since it was their last day and all.

The diversity in this book should be noted. The main characters, Mateo and Rufus, are a gay Puerto Rican and a bisexual Cuban. Other characters include Lidia, Mateo’s best friend and a teen mom, and Tagoe and Malcolm, two black teens who are friends with Rufus.

Book Review: Disturbed by Jennifer Jaynes

Disturbed by Jennifer Jaynes | rainerlife.com

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Disturbed
by Jennifer Jaynes

I received an ARC ebook from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Chelsea Dutton survived a brutal attack that left her two roommates dead. Five years after the attack, Chelsea still cannot remember her past very well… and not just the night of the attack, but her earlier life too. She lives in constant fear because the accused attacker has never been caught. After running into someone from her past, she starts to be happier and relax a little. Unfortunately, it’s a short lived happiness, because she soon starts to receive messages only her attacker could know about.

The characters were great. Chelsea is the best developed since she’s the main character, but the other characters felt real too. There’s just enough info to feel like you know the character, but there’s a little bit missing too, so you draw some conclusions that may or may not prove to be true.

This book contains some twists and turns, and will have you guessing until the end. There are hints throughout the book as to how it will end, but it’s still a bit of a guess. I mean, I wasn’t 100% sure I had it figured out.

Also, I enjoyed the writing style. It had a great flow and was a quick read. I love a good thriller, and this one was an exciting read.

Books Read in September

September Books Read | rainerlife.com

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I got some reading done this month, but it wasn’t toward my 2017 reading goals. I primarily read new releases. I guess I was more in the mood for some new books rather than books toward a specific reading goals. Most of these books were on my TBR because they sounded interesting, but some I picked up on a whim. Below are all of the books I read in September. For more info on what I’m reading, click over to my Goodreads account.

SEPTEMBER

Gilmore Girls Season 3 Books
The Brontës: Wild Genius on the Moors: The Story of Three Sisters by Juliet Barker

Nancy Drew Mystery Stories
The Triple Hoax by Carolyn Keene
The Flying Saucer Mystery by Carolyn Keene

Other books read (not toward a specific goal):
Fierce Kingdom by Gin Phillips (my review here)
The Child by Fiona Barton (my review here)
Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows by Balli Kaur Jaswal (my review here)
Are You Sleeping by Kathleen Barber (my review here)
The Jane Austen Project by Kathleen A. Flynn (my review here)
The Informationist by Taylor Stevens
Into the Water by Paula Hawkins (my review here)
He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly
Carry On by Rainbow Rowell
In the End by Demetria Lunetta
Do Not Become Alarmed by Maile Meloy (my review here)
Young Jane Young by Gabrielle Zevin (my review here)
The Almost Sisters by Joshilyn Jackson (my review here)
A Spider Sat Beside Her by K.E. Lanning (my review here)
Jane of Austin by Hillary Manton Lodge (my review here)
At Wave’s End by Patricia Perry Donovan (my review here)

Book Review: At Wave’s End by Patricia Perry Donovan

At Wave's End by Patricia Perry Donovan | rainerlife.com

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At Wave’s End
by Patricia Perry Donovan

Synopsis: A cynical New Yorker is skeptical when her mother wins a B&B on the Jersey Shore. Shortly after arriving to check out the B&B, a hurricane hits. Much of the town is destroyed, but the B&B is relatively unharmed and can house some of the displaced residents. The daughter reluctantly stays on to help her mother temporarily run the B&B.

This was a light, heartwarming story about personal discovery and a community bonding together.

The personal discovery part is about the main character, Faith. She is a chef in New York City and is distrustful of almost everyone. After her mother wins a B&B, Faith goes along with her to check the place out. Faith remains skeptical of the B&B business, the B&B owner, and various other locals. After a hurricane alters her plans and she stays at the B&B to help her mother, she encounters people without ulterior motives and that are wanting to help. Faith learns some things about herself that help her personal growth.

The community bonding part is about a small coastal town, Wave’s End, that gets hit with a hurricane and comes together to rebuild. The locals work together with cleanup efforts and getting help for those who need it most. The people support each other and are there to lift one another’s spirits when everything seems to be falling apart.

I won this book on a Goodreads Giveaway.

Book Review: Jane of Austin by Hillary Manton Lodge

Jane of Austin by Hillary Manton Lodge | rainerlife.com

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Jane of Austin: A Novel of Sweet Tea and Sensibility
by Hillary Manton Lodge

This is a modern take on Sense and Sensibility.

Three sisters stick together after their father is involved in a business scandal and flees the country. With their mother deceased, the two older sisters, Celia and Jane, share guardianship of the younger sister, Margot. Celia and Jane open a tea shop, only to be forced out and needing a new start. They move to Austin to stay with a cousin and look for a place to open a tea shop.

Jane of Austin is told mainly from Jane’s point of view, but has some chapters from Callum’s point of view. Callum is a war veteran recently returned to civilian life after losing his leg. Callum is clearly smitten with Jane, but Jane has another suitor, Sean. Jane met Sean when arriving in Austin, and thinks he is her knight in shining armor.

This was a quick, light read. It’s a clean story with no bad language, no sex, and no violence.