Vacation in Heidelberg, Germany (Part 2 of 2)

View of Heidelberg and Old Bridge from Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Last week I wrote Part 1 of our Heidelberg trip. It included information on our day in Frankfurt, where we stayed in Heidelberg, and restaurants we visited. This post is all about the sightseeing we did while in Heidelberg. We stayed a week in Heidelberg, and had plenty to do and see while we were there. Since we were traveling with a toddler, we didn’t want to cram our schedules with lots of activities. So, we took our time sightseeing, but we did see everything we wanted to see.

We stayed on Hauptstrasse, the main pedestrian street in the heart of Old Town. With that great location, we were able to walk everywhere we went. We didn’t want to worry with renting a car, so we had planned on relying on public transportation. We did take a bus when we first arrived in Heidelberg, and we took a cab on our last day, but otherwise we walked. The sights we wanted to see were all located in or near the Old Town (Altstadt) area.

Heidelberg Castle (Schloss Heidelberg)

The castle ruins are probably the most popular sightseeing thing to do in Heidelberg… and they are definitely worth visiting! We spent one day visiting the castle. We walked up to the castle so we could see more of the area surrounding it. Turns out, it’s a pretty good hike, so we got a workout that day. They do offer a train that goes to the castle, so I recommend taking it to avoid the hike. However, if you’re up for a workout and the weather’s clear, the walk up to the castle was nice… and not at all crowded.

Construction of the castle began before the 1300s. The part of the castle that remains today was finished before the 1650s. Unfortunately, lightning strikes and wars destroyed portions of the castle, leaving the ruins that remain today. I think they offer guided tours that allow visitors into part of the interior of the castle, but the only interior areas we saw were the wine barrel building, museum, and gift shop. The grounds of the castle are beautiful, so take time to walk around and see more than just the castle.

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

The Rainers at Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Michael and Gavin at Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Darinda and Gavin at Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Michael and Gavin at Heidelberg Castle (Heidelberger Schloss) | rainerlife.com

Great Terrace at Heidelberg Castle | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle grounds | rainerlife.com

Bust of Johann Wolfgang Goethe on grounds of Heidelberg Castle | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle grounds | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle grounds | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Tun

The Heidelberg Tun, or the World’s Largest Wine Barrel, was built in 1751 by Prince Elector Karl Theodor. It stands 23-feet tall and is 28-feet wide. The barrel holds 58,124 gallons of wine! The barrel was used to hold wine paid as taxes by the local wine growers. It no longer holds wine. The room where the barrel is housed has a staircase that you can climb and walk over the barrel. On top of the barrel is a dance floor.

Darinda and Gavin at the Heidelberg Tun | rainerlife.com

Michael at the Heidelberg Tun | rainerlife.com

Apothecary Museum (Deutsches Apotheken Museum)

Located in the Heidelberg Castle. This apothecary museum was very interesting! The museum has different rooms that display the history of pharmacy, including a pharmacist’s office, a laboratory, numerous pieces of equipment, plus over 1,000 raw drugs that were used in the 17th-19th centuries.

Apothecary Museum at Heidelberg Castle | rainerlife.com

Apothecary Museum at Heidelberg Castle | rainerlife.com

Apothecary Museum at Heidelberg Castle | rainerlife.com

Castle Illumination and Fireworks

The town of Heidelberg hosts the Castle Illumination and Fireworks three times a year – June, July, and September. The illumination of the castle symbolizes when the troops of Sun King Louis XIV torched the castle in 1689 and 1693, leaving the ruins that remain today. After the castle illumination, fireworks are shot from the Old Bridge. This tradition is based on when the Elector Friedrich V arranged a fireworks display in 1613 to welcome his bride, Elizabeth Stuart, to Heidelberg.

Fireworks over Heidelberg Castle | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg Castle Illumination | rainerlife.com

Old Town (Altstadt)

The Old Town of Heidelberg includes Hauptstrasse, the University area, and the Old Bridge. This is the oldest part of the city, and has a wonderful mixture of historic sights, with the modern convenience of shopping and restaurants.

Heidelberg, Germany | rainerlife.com

Old Town Heidelberg, Germany | rainerlife.com

Heidelberg, Germany | rainerlife.com

Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Festival near the Old University {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Hauptstrasse

The main street through the Old Town. Hauptstrasse is a mile-long pedestrian zone. We stayed on this street, and most of the shops and restaurants we visited were on this street.

Hauptstrasse in Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Hauptstrasse in Old Town {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Bookshop on Hauptstrasse {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Hauptstrasse in Heidelberg at night | rainerlife.com

Karl Theodor Old Bridge (Alte Brucke)

The current Old Bridge was built in 1786. This is not the original bridge built here, but it is the first bridge of stone. The other eight bridges that once stood here were all built of wood and destroyed by floods or war. The bridge crosses the Neckar River and connects the Old Town to the Neuenheim district of the city.

The Old Bridge (Alte Brücke) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

The bridge has two sculptures on it, Prince Elector Karl Theodor and Roman goddess Minerva. Karl Theodor had the bridge built, so a monument stands in his honor. The other sculpture was dedicated to Minerva, goddess of wisdom, because Theodor was a supporter of the arts and sciences.

Karl Theodor Sculpture on Old Bridge {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Minerva Sculpture on Old Bridge {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

The medieval bridge gate on the Old Town side of the bridge was once part of the city wall. The two towers were once used as a guardhouse and jail.

Bridge Gate on the Old Bridge in Heidelberg | rainerlife.com

On the Neuenheim district side of the Old Bridge is a Love Stone (Heidelberger Liebesstein) with Love Locks attached to it. Apparently, people sometimes attach locks to the Old Bridge, and the city was afraid of potential damage the locks could cause. For a compromise, the city had this monument put up, and people can attach locks to it. A love poem is engraved into the stone, plus the center of the monument has a hole for photo opportunities.

Love Locks near the Old Bridge {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Love locks at end of Old Bridge {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Bridge Monkey (Brückenaffe)

The history of a Heidelberg bridge monkey dates back to the 15th century. The current sculpture was built by Gernot Rumpf and installed in 1979. The bronze monkey is holding a mirror, and is supposed to symbolize that the city people are no better than those outside the city, and they should look over their shoulder when leaving the city to remember that. It’s a popular tourist attraction, and has a couple of superstitions associated with it. Supposedly, if you touch the monkey’s fingers you will return to Heidelberg one day, if you touch the mirror you will receive wealth, and if you touch the mice located next to the monkey you will have lots of children.

Bridge Monkey at Old Bridge {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Bronze Badge next to Bridge Monkey on Old Bridge {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Market Square (Marktplatz)

This busy square is located between the Church of the Holy Spirit and the Town Hall. This square has a interesting history because of the many public proceedings that were held here. Some of the things done in this square included burning witches at the stake and putting petty criminals in cages to be tormented by the locals. In addition, it was the market square, where fruits, vegetables, flowers, meats, and crafts were sold. Markets still take place a couple of times a week. During the warm weather months, like when we were visiting, the square is full of tables and chairs set our by the nearby restaurants. In the center of the square is a fountain of Hercules.

Market Square (Marktplatz) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Market Square {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Market Square {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Market Square and Church of the Holy Spirit {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Church of the Holy Spirit (Heiliggeistkirche)

The Church of the Holy Spirit is located next to Market Square. The foundations of the current Gothic church were laid in 1398. Over the years, the church has been used by Catholics and Protestants. It is currently used by Protestants.

Church of the Holy Spirit (Heiliggiestkirche) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Church of the Holy Spirit (Heiliggiestkirche) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Corn Market (Kornmarkt)

This once served as a market square and is still used today. One day we were there, the square was full of people selling crafts. In the center of this square is a Madonna statue. The statue was placed here in 1718 by the Jesuits.

Kornmarkt {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Kornmarkt {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Karlstor

This arch was built built 1775-1781 to honor Elector Karl Theodor.

Karlstor {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Jesuit Church (Jesuitenkirche)

The Jesuit Church was built between 1712-1759, with the bell tower added in 1872. We could see this church from our apartment… it was at the end of the road directly across from the apartment we rented. This church is still used by Catholics.

Jesuit Church {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Jesuit Church {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Marstall

This building was constructed during the early 16th century and is one of the oldest buildings in Heidelberg. It was originally built as an arsenal, but has had various other uses over the years, including use as stables, military barracks, and a hospital. The interior has been redesigned over the years, depending on the purpose of the building. It is currently part of the university and houses dining halls.

Heidelberg, Germany | rainerlife.com

Old University (Alte Universitat)

Heidelberg University was founded in 1386. The Old University building houses the university museum and the Great Hall. The building was constructed between 1712 and 1728. The university museum displays cover the university’s history from it’s founding up until the end of the 20th century. The Great Hall was beautiful to see. This auditorium was redesigned in in 1886, in honor of the university’s 500th anniversary. The auditorium is currently used for ceremonies and special events.

Old University {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Old University (Alte Universitat) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Student Prison (Studentenkarzer)

The student prison is located behind the Old University. The prison was established in 1778 and was used until 1914. Though it was an official jail, it was less formal than most jails. For instance, the students were allowed to attend classes, as long as they returned to jail after class. The walls of the prison are covered in writings and artwork (i.e., graffiti) done by the student prisoners.

Student Jail (Studentenkarzer) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Student Jail (Studentenkarzer) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Student Jail (Studentenkarzer) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Student Jail (Studentenkarzer) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

University Library (Universitatsbibliothek)

The university library’s history dates back to the 1380s, when the university started to acquire book collections. The current library was built in 1905 using the Renaissance style of the castle as influence. This library contains more than 3 million books and is one of the most used libraries in Germany.

University Library {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

St. Peter’s Church (Peterskirche)

The oldest church in Heidelberg. No documentation states exactly when the church was constructed, but is was sometime during the 12th century. This church is near the University Library and it serves as the university church. Protestant services are currently held here.

St. Peter's Church {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

Königstuhl Funicular (Bergbahn)

A train that goes up to Königstuhl. The train leaves Kornmarkt, and has three stops: Heidelberg Castle, Molkenkur, and Königstuhl. Molkenkur is a transfer station, so you have to get off the train from Kornmarkt and walk over to another train to take you up to Königstuhl. We didn’t explore this area, so I’m not sure what all they have to offer here.

Königstuhl Funicular (Bergbahn) {Heidelberg, Germany} | rainerlife.com

King’s Throne (Königstuhl)

Part of the Odenwald Mountains that offers great views of Heidelberg. While we were riding the train, we saw a few people paragliding from the top of the mountain. Once we reached the top, one person was preparing to paraglide, so we stopped to watch the action. There are several hiking trails here. We walked on one trail for a little while to see some of the area.

View of Heidelberg from The Königstuhl | rainerlife.com

Trails at Königstuhl | rainerlife.com

Trails at Königstuhl | rainerlife.com

Trails at Königstuhl | rainerlife.com

Trails at Königstuhl | rainerlife.com

River Cruise on Neckar River

This was our only excursion from Heidelberg. We took the three-hour river cruise that went to Neckarsteinach and back to Heidelberg. We sat on the sun deck and enjoyed a beautiful day of sightseeing… while giving our feet a rest! The cruise we were on offered food and drinks for sale, so we had a late lunch aboard the ship. The ship boarded at Heidelberg and had stops in Neckargemünd and Neckarsteinach. Neckargemünd is a small town that has the charm of a 17th century village. Neckarsteinach is best known for having four castles, all of which are visible from the river. The castles were built between the 1100s and 1335. The castles are Vorderburg, the Mittelburg, the Hinterburg, and the Schadeck. The Vorderburg is the oldest of the castles, it is privately owned and not open to the public. The Mittelburg was built around 1200, and is also privately owned and not open to the public. The Hinterburg was built around 1220, and has fallen to ruins over the years, but it is open to the public. The Schadeck was the last castle built, and is also in ruins and open to the public.

Dam on Neckar River | rainerlife.com

View from Neckar River Cruise | rainerlife.com

Campers along Neckar River | rainerlife.com

Neckargemünd on Neckar River | rainerlife.com

Neckargemünd on Neckar River | rainerlife.com

Neckarsteinach on the Neckar River | rainerlife.com

Schadeck Castle in Neckarsteinach | rainerlife.com

Hinterburg Castle in Neckarsteinach | rainerlife.com

Mittelburg Castle in Neckarsteinach | rainerlife.com

Vorderburg Castle in Neckarsteinach | rainerlife.com

View from Neckar River Cruise | rainerlife.com

Neckar River | rainerlife.com

Author: Darinda

Darinda lives in East Texas with her husband and son. She loves reading and traveling.

3 thoughts on “Vacation in Heidelberg, Germany (Part 2 of 2)”

  1. Been looking forward to this post – the castles are really amazing- I’m do head you shared the interesting history about the area. The churches are spectacular- beautiful countryside (even RV’s beside the river – we can’t find a spot like that here). Thank you for the great post on y’all’s fabulous trip!

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